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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Indigenous Programming

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Indigenous education and reconciliation are very important priorities for the university. Led by indigenous Education and Cultural Services and the President's Indigenous Reconciliation Taskforce, we strive to build, throughout the campus community, a sense of gratitude, understanding and appreciation for indigenous people, their history, and the land they have welcomed us to share with them.

October

  • Indigenous Introduction - Shifting the Narrative
    • Facilitator: Jill Thompson and Carol Ducharme
    • Time: 2:30pm - 4pm
    • Date: October 21st, 2020

    Did you ever wonder what are the proper terms to refer to Indigenous Peoples?

    Have you ever questioned where Indigenous stereotypes came from, or the damage they cause?

    In this session, we will explore these questions, and learn how to shift the narrative about Indigenous people in Canada, by understanding their perspectives, and then recognize the impact of the Residential School System and the TRC as a process. The audience will engage in a debrief and discussion with a live Q & A with facilitators. The intention of this workshop is to provide an introductory understanding of Indigenous peoples and shift the narrative as a stepping stone towards reconciliation.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Identify three distinct Indigenous groups in Canada and how to acknowledge and talk to them in a good way
    • Compare and contrast Western and Indigenous worldviews
    • Discuss the Residential School System impacts, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the process in a holistic framework

    register


November


February

  • Choker Workshop
    • Facilitator: Rick Bourque
    • Time: 2pm - 3:30pm
    • Date: February 22, 2021

March

  • Earring Workshop
    • Facilitator: Rick Bourque
    • Time: 2pm - 3:30pm
    • Date: March 16, 2021

April

  • What's in a Name?
    • Facilitator: Jill Thompson and Carol Ducharme
    • Duration: 2pm - 3:30pm
    • Date: April 20, 2021

     


June 2021

  • Medicine Walk
      • Company and Facilitator: Rick Bourque
      • Duration: 2pm - 4pm
      • Date: June 16, 2021
    •  
    • register 


Treaties Recognition Playlists

  • Treaties Recognition Playlists

    Indigenous education and reconciliation are very important priorities for the university. Led by Indigenous Education and Cultural Services and the President’s Indigenous Reconciliation Taskforce, we strive to build, throughout the campus community, a sense of gratitude, understanding and appreciation for Indigenous people, their history, and the land they have welcomed us to share with them.  

    Given the goals of reconciliation and ongoing education, we have made a number of interesting and helpful video resources available to students, staff and faculty through the library website.

    The Library has subscribed to two video playlists. The first is the Future History Series, a television show that looks back at the history of the Indigenous community and looks forward to their brighter future. The second is a Treaties Recognition Playlist, which tells the history of treaties in Canada as well as other important Indigenous stories that have affected our nation and its cultural landscape.

    Note: Login with your network ID and password.

    We highly recommend you watch these videos and share them with others interested in supporting our journey toward reconciliation.

    Many other resources on Indigenous studies are also available, including books, databases, statistics and data. You can find links to these resources in the Library’s research guide.

    For more information, contact Indigenous Education and Cultural Services.