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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Indigenous Programming

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Indigenous education and reconciliation are very important priorities for the university. Led by indigenous Education and Cultural Services and the President's Indigenous Reconciliation Taskforce, we strive to build, throughout the campus community, a sense of gratitude, understanding and appreciation for indigenous people, their history, and the land they have welcomed us to share with them.

October 2021

  • Indigenous Words

    Facilitator: Jill Thompson and Alyssa McLeod
    Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m.
    Date: Wednesday, October 20
    Intro to Anishinaabemowin and Indigenous Language: Everyday and Common (Ontario Tech) Phrases
    Description: Learn about the Indigenous words present throughout the university community, from campus spaces, land and/or territory acknowledgment as well as greetings and farewells.

    Register


December 2021

  • Christmas Craft

    Small Moccasin ornament on string

    Facilitator: Rick Bourque
    Time: 2 to 4 p.m.
    Date: Wednesday, December 1

     

    This special craft will have a Christmas theme.

    REGISTER


February 2022

  • Child Moccasins

    Facilitator: Rick Bourque
    Time: 1 to 4 p.m.
    Date: Wednesday, February 2 and Wednesday, February 9

    Maximum of 10 participants for this session. 

    rEGISTER


April 2022


                                                                                      

Indigenous education and reconciliation are very important priorities for the university. Led by Indigenous Education and Cultural Services and the President’s Indigenous Reconciliation Taskforce, we strive to build, throughout the campus community, a sense of gratitude, understanding and appreciation for Indigenous people, their history, and the land they have welcomed us to share with them.  

Given the goals of reconciliation and ongoing education, we have made a number of interesting and helpful video resources available to students, staff and faculty through the library website.

The Library has subscribed to two video playlists. The first is the Future History Series, a television show that looks back at the history of the Indigenous community and looks forward to their brighter future. The second is a Treaties Recognition Playlist, which tells the history of treaties in Canada as well as other important Indigenous stories that have affected our nation and its cultural landscape.

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We highly recommend you watch these videos and share them with others interested in supporting our journey toward reconciliation.

Many other resources on Indigenous studies are also available, including books, databases, statistics and data. You can find links to these resources in the Library’s research guide.

For more information, contact Indigenous Education and Cultural Services.